Sunday Funnies – LOLs, October 18th, 2020

Submitted as an LOL by Peter. Winter Wallaby would also give it an Oy tag. And maybe a Geezer tag?

Sent in by ChemGal, with emphasis on the bonus panel.

49 Comments

  1. Just yesterday I carried out my previously stated intention to watch “MASH” again. As far as I could tell, Gary Burghoff (aka “Radar”) was the only actor in the movie who remained in the series.

  2. Didn’t he become a politician? Or was that Klinger? Or am I just making that up? I only saw one complete episode – the head guy got to go home and was shot down, so I’m not really sure . . . Even so, I do think M*A*S*H is so much in the popular culture that EVERYone knows the main characters.

  3. Andréa, it sounds like the episode you saw was Season 3, Episode 24 (season finale), https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0763200/plotsummary?ref_=tttr_ql_stry_2 . As one of those comments says, it was “one of the best remembered and most emotional episodes of the entire 11 year series,”

    IMDb lists three items under “spin-offs” but IMO that is questionable. “Trapper John, M.D.” uses a character from MASH in his later life, but I did watch it for a while and thought there was no connection beyond his nominal identity. (There probably was some exploration of his memories of war, or maybe a visit from old MASH companion — but not much.) There was also a one-time short called “W*A*L*T*E*R” and centered on Radar, just after the war. (The weird punctuation of the title makes me think of “H*Y*M*A*N K*A*P*L*A*N” though I know that wasn’t the intention.) He became a police.

    The one I would call a genuine spin-off series was “After MASH “. “The Korean War has ended. Colonel Potter, Sergeant Klinger, and Father Mulcahy find themselves together once again, this time at a veteran’s hospital”.

  4. Has anyone [else] heard Harry Morgan’s monologue about having to pour all his liquor down the sink, and he takes a swallow of each bottle before doing so, and gets funnier as the monologue goes on? I’d only heard it on WFMT’s Midnight Special, years (and years) ago, but haven’t found it online anywhere.

  5. >Even so, I do think M*A*S*H is so much in the popular culture that EVERYone knows the main characters.

    I’d like to believe this but no. My 30 something friends universally consider it by definition before their time and unknowable and do not know the name of any of the characters.

    I’ve never understood the point of the geezer tag but if anything deserves one, this does.

    Trapper John MD was made by the same people who made the “Lou Grant” the Mary Taylor Moore spin-off. I’ve always wanted to compile a list of t.v. spin-offs that differ in genre from the original. (I’ve also always thought someone should write pilots of shows in every genre (soap, sitcom, crime series, drama, etc, etc) all sit in the Tellytubby universe.

    Anyhow, in the pilot of Trapper John MD he impressed a young hot-shot resident with an anecdote (actually not actually an anecdote but and rumor that he had anecdotes) about the time he and his army buddy Hawkeye once stopped up the nurses’ shower. Other than that it was referred to that he was in Korea now and then but as it took place 24 years later (was 24 years once considered a long time??? It’s impossible to imagine that) and it was a different actor it was pretty weak link. “Lou Grant” at least starred Ed Asner, now a hard-biting and hard-bitten newspaper editor, gruff but otherwise not really the same character. And *never* a mention of his in television news or his time in Minneapolis.

  6. Then again, the strip *does* say “Throwback Thursdaze” so the cartoonist is aware…. (it my half-asleep logic I somehow just assumed the “throwback” was a reference to the character’s pony tail).

    The one abouts Lot’s Wife had potential but was too stretched and contrived. How is turning into 100% salt supposed to be …. whatever it’s supposed to be? And what *is* it supposed to be? And “looking back” doesn’t seem to be any more applicable to cable news than anything else.

    And bald characters…. why would Zippy the Pinhead be any more or less insulting than any of the others?

  7. “. . . My 30 something friends . . . ”

    Well, that ‘splains my problem – I don’t HAVE any 30-something friends ‘-). My few friends are all of the same age group, and we mostly talk/email about dogs & books, not TV/movies. Except BritComs, sometimes.

  8. ” . . . why would Zippy the Pinhead be any more or less insulting than any of the others?”

    To use the non-PC term, there is the intimation of mental deficiency (‘retardation’). I’ve often wondered if he was a cartoon take on Schlitzie Surtees, from the movie, ‘Freaks’.

  9. Same routine, different raconteur. Of course, this was funnier at a time when alcoholism wasn’t recognized as a disease; it isn’t so funny these days.

  10. If that’s the routine I’m thinking of, MAD magazine also did it in comic strip form with (if I recall correctly) Henry Morgan as the “narrator/drinker.”

    And no doubt Henry Morgan would get a geezer tag these days. Or an “uber-geezer” tag, if there is such a thing.

  11. @Woozy: So in the case of the movie BEING JOHN MALKINBERG, you stated on another thread that:
    ” I’m saying it’s not at all close to obscure. I claim it’s got a title that *everyone* finds recallable and thus not “close to obscure”.
    but in the case of M*A*S*H: “My 30 something friends universally consider it by definition before their time and unknowable and do not know the name of any of the characters. ”

    I’m always suspicious of aboslutes (“everyone” and “universally”). Don’t you think that some of your 30-something friends might at least know the name of one or two characters (have you asked all of them?) and/or that some people somewhere in the world (maybe even in the United States. . .) might *not* find the BJM title recallable (maybe some of your 50- or 60-some acquaintances don’t; again I doubt you’ve asked all possible contacts). For what it’s worth, I just asked my wife (who is 72) if the phrase “Being John Malkovich” meant anything to her and she said no, that she didn’t remember having ever heard it.

  12. There’s a Harry Morgan and a Henry Morgan, both rather recognizable if you’ve seen them before but not looming large for most people.

    Harry Morgan entered this thread with Andréa’s comment of 9:14 AM, but leaving unstated the relevance to this thread. The MASH-viewers of course will remember him as Col. Potter, the commander starting in Season 4.

  13. Andrea, are you familiar with the recent series “Drunk History”? That one has been generally well-received, and the two episodes I saw were pretty funny, and actually pretty close to historically correct, in a drunk sort of way.

  14. Is it the same one that’s on YouTube? I saw them, but never viewed them. Unfortunately, I’m too immersed in politics at the moment to watch much else. I spend WAAAAAY too much time on my computer, but then, all my friends live there ‘-)

    I just started a new group on groups.io, as Yahoogroups is closing down its groups, and am making a website for it, which is also keeping me busy (and distracted from politics, thankfully).

    On your recommendation, if it’s the same series, I’ll take some time to watch a few episodes.

    Yep, my bad . . . any mention of M*A*S*H brings Harry Morgan to mind and off I went without clarification or relevantification (that’s a handy made-up word).

  15. Working Daze was one of the funniest I’ve seen in a long time. That’s going to be an eye-worm [cousin of an ear-worm] for me every time I see one of those signs.

  16. I think everyone knows that there was a TV series called MASH, but I don’t think everyone can recognize and name the characters.

    As Shrug indicates, whether we think something is commonly known is highly influenced by what we know, and what our friends know. Despite the fact that MASH was popular in my youth, I never watched a full episode.

  17. I only saw one complete episode – the head guy got to go home and was shot down

    Spoiler Alert!!

    Kidding.

  18. The MASH-viewers of course will remember him as Col. Potter,
    But I remember him initially from “Pete and Gladys”, TV sitcom from 1960-62.

  19. It always seemed to me like when they cast “Trapper John M. D.” that they decided to get the white actor who looks the least like Wayne Rogers as possible.

  20. Before they knew that McLean Stevenson would need to be replaced, Harry Morgan appeared as a guest star in the third season, portraying an absolutely wacko, gung-ho general. I don’t recall seeing the episode during the original run, but seeing a re-run of it years later was jarring: it was very difficult to reconcile the same actor playing two completely roles in the same series (less than one year apart).

  21. In my mind, Wayne Rogers’ series House Calls with Lynn Redgrave was the Trapper John MASH spin-off…

  22. Andrea, re the actor who became a politician: I think you are thinking of Fred Gandy of “The Love Boat,” who represented Iowa in the House, from’86 to ‘95.

  23. “It always seemed to me like when they cast “Trapper John M. D.” that they decided to get the white actor who looks the least like Wayne Rogers as possible.”

    From what I hear, the show was listed as a spin-off from the movie, rather than the TV show. You should compare his appearance to Elliott Gould. And also note that he’s almost 30 years older in the series than in the film.

  24. Andréa: I think Brian was kidding. (Since he said “kidding.”)

    If the show has been off the air for 30+ years, and I still haven’t watched a full episode, it seems unlikely that I’ll get into it now; doesn’t seem like it calls for spoiler alerts.

  25. You never know. I resisted the Discworld books for a long time even though many on rec.arts.sf.written praised them. I don’t read much fantasy. But I decided to try them, and like some of them quite a bit. I also recently started the Murderbot Diaries series after ignoring it, but that because I had misunderstood what it was about from an early review.

  26. Brian in STL: True, it’s conceivable I could still get into MASH (although it’s not too likely, since I don’t even watch a lot of TV anyway). But I wouldn’t complain about spoilers even if I did.

  27. “Andrea, re the actor who became a politician: I think you are thinking of Fred Gandy of “The Love Boat,” who represented Iowa in the House, from’86 to ‘95.”

    Oh, I thought the comment was about a MASH character who became a politician in a spin-off. If we’re talking about real-life politics by the actors, then you might be thinking of Mike Farrell (BJ). He’s quite a political activist.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Farrell#Political_activism

  28. “The actor who became a politician”– you mean Ronald Reagan?

    Actually, before it became a more common phenomenon, I was fond of pointing to other countries, where you could find the remarkable actor Glenda Jackson becoming a M.P. and junior minister; and Melina Mercouri in the Greek parliament and then Minister of Culture.

    Lost in A^2 points out Fred Gandy of “The Love Boat,” who represented Iowa in the House, and maybe that’s who I was thinking of from a different 60s/70s tv universe, the Andy Griffith / Mayberry cluster. Was there somebody from there who went into politics? Floyd the Barber? No, and not Jim Nabors either.

    I was convinced there was an actor from the early days of Law & Order, playing a D.A. or similar high-ranking prosecutor (*not* Sam Waterston as Jack McCoy, originally an Assistant D.A., but his boss, an elected official). It turns out, yes, that was Fred Thompson,” D.A. Arthur Branch (116 episodes, 2002-2007)” , who “served in the United States Senate representing Tennessee from 1994 to 2003, and was a Republican presidential candidate in 2008.” [Wikipedia] . Hey wait a minute, is that the right order?? He was on L&O *after* being Senator? Wha?

    But alongside Fred Thompson, while I was wandering around in IMDb for this, and from time to time watching old episodes, I thought it was Steven Hill, who played the D.A. in the first few years of L&O (but not appearing in the pilot). But no, he didn’t have a politics career. So why was I focussing on him? Aha, it’s because his *character* was “Adam Schiff” and there is of course the real Adam Schiff a currently prominent U.S. Rep from California.

    And finally that suggests actor Richard Schiff, who as far as I see is not related to Adam Schiff, and does not have a political career of his own, but played a political advisor (not elected official) for a long stretch on The West Wing.

    Now I will have to retrain my jump-to-ID mind to not see Rep. Adam Schiff on news and shout out “Oh, he was on Law & Order in the early days!”.

  29. Sorry I missed Pete’s comment while I was typing, but I join him in thinking Andréa’s original question was about ” a MASH character who became a politician in a spin-off”. I don’t think we’ve identified anybody in that role, though.

  30. There was also the weird mechanic on Dukes of Hazzard who went to Congress. He (the character, Cooter) was in many ways similar to Radar (without the psi/magic hearing trick). The actor (Ben Jones) was in the House of Representatives for Georgia for four years.

  31. Dr. Emmett Brown: Who’s President of the United States in 1985?
    Marty McFly: Ronald Reagan.
    Dr. Emmett Brown: Ronald Reagan?! The actor?! Ha! Then who’s Vice President? Jerry Lewis?

  32. Played Bill Gannon (I think) on the remake of Dragnet. I even remember enjoying the Ed O’Neill Dragnet re-remake (although I don’t think I saw more than 10 episodes).

  33. Shrug: For what it’s worth, I just asked my wife (revealing whose age could be dangerous) if the phrase “Being John Malkovich” meant anything to her and she said pretty much the same as me — coming out of the theater thinking “WTF?”

  34. Played Bill Gannon (I think) on the remake of Dragnet.

    And of course the same character in the Dan Ackroyd Dragnet movie.

  35. > Don’t you think that some of your 30-something friends might at least know the name of one or two characters (have you asked all of them?)

    I wouldn’t have said that if I hadn’t asked them. The *only* interaction I have with them is Pub Trivia so…. yes, I know this about them as a certainty. (about them) And consdering the scores of the rest of the teams I conclude that MASH is not the cultural icon in general that …. say…. the honeymooners was to me.

    (There were incidences of my complete ignorance of the HoneyMooners in my youth. A friend of mine in college (my age) was once appalled I didn’t know Ed Norton worked in a sewer or that I couldn’t recognize his imitation.)

    “I’m always suspicious of absolutes (“everyone” and “universally”)” And well you should be. I *did* say that my claim of BJM being recognizable *was* purely subjective and there’s no way I’d be able to claim it objectively as an absolute. It was in reaction to the claim it was as “close to obscure” as possible. The wiggle room of “close to” doesn’t make it any more objectively factual and I was simply sticking to my guns that I firmly disagree (even though it is impossible to verify).

  36. The idea of After Mash was suppose to be that Trapper John used what he learned in Korea and practiced the in the same manner as he did while in Korea – the sort of gung ho, ignore the rules doctor.

  37. “A friend of mine in college (my age) was once appalled I didn’t know Ed Norton worked in a sewer or that I couldn’t recognize his imitation.)”

    We imitate the ‘Ed Norton writing’ quite often in this household. One of our dogs would start to jump on the couch, then back up, then start, then back up . . . we’d say, ‘Oh, Bonny’s doing her Ed Norton routine again!’

  38. ” . . . the sort of gung ho, ignore the rules doctor.”

    I wonder if that’s where the idea of Hugh Laurie’s ‘House’ came from . . . ? Much more successful, obviously.

  39. There is an expression “shooting his cuffs” which I didn’t understand until someone said It’s like Ed Norton getting ready to write or do something detailed with his hands. Which made it entirely clear to me – – even though we probably never see him wearing a long sleeved shirt or cuffs! (Indeed, wasn’t it most often a sleeveless vest?)

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