7 Comments

  1. Someone once told me the way to understand a David Lynch film was to realize a person with an unreliable perception’s story told third person as though the unreliable perceptions were the objective reality and it’s just a matter of figuring who that narative belongs to and what event caused it to be unreliable

    So I’ve found to understand Cornered is it’s always about a common idiomatic phrase that when taken literally but for unconventional interpretation comes to a strange conclusion so it’s matter of figuring the phrase and what the alternative interpretation can lead to its conclusion.

    So here is it when someone says they “are afraid of losing a connection” it usually means that some technology failure makes the connection fail. Here the emphasis is not on losing the connection but on *not* loosing a connection after all. And one way to not lose a connection despite technology failures is to be two feet apart.

  2. Oh… and “you’re still here” as in “you are in this physical locality” not “we still have a phone connection”.

  3. “I don’t get it, but the absurdity made me laugh anyway.”

    Other people have said that some level of absurdity is needed for humor, but isn’t enough by itself. For some, in some cases, absurdity is enough. For some, in some cases, some logic connecting the absurdity to the situation is needed. I think that this dichotomy in part explains the existence of CIDU.

  4. All those explanations about not losing a connection because they are 2 feet apart does not explain why the desk is outdoors, and why it is right outside what looks like the front door of the house.

  5. “because they are 2 feet apart does not explain why the desk is outdoors, and why it is right outside what looks like the front door of the house.”

    Because the misapplied literallism of a Cornered joke is misinterpretting cause with effect. The desk is right outside the house *because* 1) in such a situation they would not lose a connection and 2) when she says “you are still *here*” she can be literal.

    Being outside the house has no reason, but in such a situation these mundane statements would be excessively and overtly true. And that is the humor. The entire universe and laws of expectation and common sense are upended simply to have a common statement become a inevetible tautology.

    I’m not saying it *is* funny. But that is what the joke is.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s