29 Comments

  1. It’s F-. That’s the joke.

    Some people don’t eat meat and prefer vegetables to meat. But more people prefer cookies to meat or vegetables so there are a lot more orders of cookie burgers.

    I’m not sure it’s about the cookie monster per se. It’d be just as funny (which as this is F- is to say, not at all) if there were a few hundred orders for ice cream burgers.

  2. Not surprisingly, there are a number of “cookie burgers” to be found on the internet. Some are all dessert concoctions that look like burgers, some are actual burgers with cookies as the “bun”. The latter is similar I suppose to using donuts as buns. Not really appealing to me,

  3. …and as for what dessert could qualify as a “cookie burger,” the French macaron comes to mind. Though perhaps that’s more of a cookie slider.

  4. Seems to me this is more of a statement about the American diet and preferences for sweet. A few cheese burgers, one veggie burger (who really eats that) and a bunch of sweet cookie burgers. In that light, I thought it was somewhere between a chuckle and an ew.

  5. It could be that the cookie monster is in the restaurant. The idea that cookie monster could be walking around and going to a hamburger place and chefs have to deal with his order, is by F- standards, enough of a joke. But so is the idea that if people can substitute vegitables for meat then they can substitute cookies. F- standards aren’t really ones it would behoove any of us to adopt.

  6. Could it be that he’s making fun of himself, e.g., his hamburger art looks like cookies?

    He may have drawn it and his kid said, “Daddy, hamburgers don’t have chocolate ships on them,” and he thought that was a better joke than the original.

  7. A joke consists of an ambiguity that is resolved in an unexpected way. A picture is given, either visual, or with words, or sounds. The audience is led to expect one meaning, then the punchline reveals a different meaning.

    In this case, a cook is shown flipping round objects on a grill. The audience naturally assumes they are some sort of burger. The punchline reveals that actually they are cookies.

    A problem is the art is the wrong way round. Reading left to right, we see the punchline before the setup. Flipping the art, we’d see the cookies first, and the speaker second. Even then it would have been a weak joke.

  8. The burgers look like cookies because of the way they are drawn. That is the whole joke.

    As Pete said, it would be better if one saw the burgers first, but I think a lot of people go straight for the word balloon, so I don’t think there is much that could be done about this.

  9. “As Pete said, it would be better if one saw the burgers first, but I think a lot of people go straight for the word balloon, so I don’t think there is much that could be done about this.”

    If that *is* the joke, then the dialog bubble could be “Four customers think these are ‘interesting’ but the most common response is ‘chocolate chip cookies really shouldn’t be fried'”.

  10. one veggie burger (who really eats that)

    Is that a serious question? Many people don’t eat meat or prefer not to all the time. The latest products are proving quite popular. One of my brothers went through phases of trying to be vegetarian. Once when we were at a restaurant he ordered the “veggie burger”. To his surprise, that meant a burger with lettuce and tomato.

  11. I like animal flesh in my diet, and I eat veggie burgers. I used to be grossly obese, and one way I lost 100 pounds was by substituting vegetables for meats and starches in my diet. A Boca burger is 70 calories. A beef burger that size would be about 150. This matters. There are other reasons one could give (like the huge environmental footprint of beef production) but that’s how I got into the habit.

  12. I tried my first veggie burger this year in Folkestone (named “Love burger”). It was ok but the meat flavor was unexpected.

  13. Re: Pete – A joke consists of an ambiguity that is resolved in an unexpected way.

    Some will recall a rather peculiar writer named Arthur Koestler who was maybe primarily known for political writing, including the novel Darkness at Noon and an essay contributed to The god that Failed, a collection of Anti-communist pieces (that is, by former Communist adherents). But he dabbled in other areas, including history of science, intellectual history in general, and something like psychology.

    In the latter area, his The Act of Creation was a general consideration of artistic, scientific, and general creativity. At its center (or so it seemed to me long ago) was a theory of humor. Similar to Pete’s, but instead of saying ambiguity he looks for a related doubleness in terms of collision of two (or more) frames of reference.

  14. The frying burgers look a little like raw White Castle slider patties (or at least how they used to look; I don’t recall noticing one in recent years) — e.g. interspersed holes punched through the patty to, I guess, let the surrounding meat ‘breathe” or something? Not that White Castles taste like chocolate chips.

    Though I recall one work party decades ago when the host had gone out and bought several dozen white castles and put them in the middle of the table where people were marching around collating a program book and popping White Castles in their mouth at the end of each round, when someone remarked that if you think of them as hamburgers, they’re not so much, but it you think of them as hamburger-flavored potato chips, they’re pretty good.

  15. In theory Whities are a type of hamburger, but not really. They’re just their own thing. A really good thing. My buddy the former management type used to get a bunch of Castles on the last day of work before the holiday break and go around handing them out. He said White Castle was a place you could go in in the morning, order 100 and a cup of coffee, and they wouldn’t blink an eye. By the time he’d finish the coffee the order would be ready for distribution.

  16. @Shrug: The holes mean the meat cooks more quickly. It might not seem like much, but saving a few seconds per patty can add up over the day.

    As for thinking of foods as something else to make them better, I recall an article I read long ago in Car and Driver magazine. Michael Nesmith (yes, that Michael Nesmith) and PJ O’Rourke (back when you used to funny, not a right-wing political bloviator) were on a road trip in the then new Jeep Cherokee. They were accompanied by a Frenchman, a representative from Renault, a partner of AMC at the time. O’Rourke reported that Nesmith was trying to explain Franco-American tinned spaghetti to this foreigner:
    “If you think of it as spaghetti, it’s not very good. If you think of it as tomato soup with noodles, it’s actually pretty good.”

  17. “They were accompanied by a Frenchman, a representative from Renault, a partner of AMC at the time.”

    When the reps from Renault visited the Midwest (usually Kenosha, where the cars were produced, the Detroit area, where the headquarters were located, and also sometimes Yuma, AZ, where the test track was located), my dad, who was an AMC engineer in Kenosha, would be paid inordinate amounts of $$ to accompany them, as he spoke French (in Holland, several languages are taught as a matter of course, and besides, Paris was only a few hours away via train).

    When AMC/Renault/Chrysler shut down its plant in Kenosha, the entire town went nuts. However, it is finally recovering, altho it has become a ‘bedroom community’ between Chicago and Milwaukee; a testament to NOT basing your entire economy on ONE product/company.

  18. “If you think of it as spaghetti, it’s not very good. If you think of it as tomato soup with noodles, it’s actually pretty good.”

    As a kid, one of my favorite Campbell’s soups was Tomato-beef Noodle-O. They don’t make it anymore. But you can just get a can of Spaghetti-Os and add a little water. Same thing.

  19. I never much related to Spaghetti-O”s themselves. But the jingle from their TV ads worked its way into my brain so well that I cannot express mild alarm by saying “Uh-oh!” without at least mentally completing it with “Spaghetti-O’s!”

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