10 Comments

  1. All the good jokes about mad cow disease were made 20 years ago, and this is what was left over.

  2. I agree with Arthur. No amount of explanation will be able to rescue this DOA comic, so let’s ignore it and wait for a better one tomorrow.

  3. Simple combination of anger management (she’s MAD because she has been fenced in) and BSE (aka MAD cow disease).
    Unfortunately, it seems to imply that BSE is caught like tetanus or that angry people are sick.

  4. There are still a few things in life that are not appropriate for comics, IMO: Cancer (a la Funky Winterbean), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (of which Mad Cow Disease is one form), Alzheimer’s (a la Barney & Clyde and the old guys in Crankshaft), and a few others . . . so no, this isn’t funny. Wasn’t funny when others did it; isn’t funny now.

  5. And even long before “mad cow disease” was something the general public recognized and jokes wore out, there were millions of kids in classrooms being told not to say “mad” for “angry” as that supposedly isn’t what the word means. . Also we were told that “kids” was incorrect for young of the human species…

  6. “There are still a few things in life that are not appropriate for comics”

    Counterpoint: John Callahan.

  7. Had it been something like “So I was waiting in line for feed and this young hussy with udders up to here cut in front of me and got fed first. It made me so MAD” this would have been an acceptable (albeit corny) joke on mad cow = angry cow.

    But “sharp pain”, “blood, “sharp barbs” is so *violent* and specific it get distracting.

    >”there were millions of kids in classrooms being told not to say “mad” for “angry” as that supposedly isn’t what the word means. ”

    There were? What does “mad” mean then? Yes, I know in England it primarily means crazed but in the United States “mad” meaning “angry” has been acceptable and primary for at least a century.

    Hmm, I remember when I distinctly learned that “sad” and “mad” weren’t synonyms where which first letter you used wasn’t just a matter of choice.

  8. People have been railing against people railing against people’s English usage for quite some time. For instance, Theodore Bernstein wrote this one in 1971: Miss Thistlebottom’s Hobgoblins: The Careful Writer’s Guide To The Taboos, Bugbears, and Outmoded Rules of English Usage. I recommend it.

  9. @woozy: Earliest relevant (“mad” as “angry”) hits in the OED appear to be:

    6. (a) Of a person: beside oneself with anger; moved to uncontrollable rage; furious. (b) Angry, irate, cross. Also, in weakened sense: annoyed, exasperated (with †against, at, with, etc.). Now colloquial (chiefly North American) and British regional.
    a1400 (▸a1325) Cursor Mundi (Vesp.) 17595 For-þi þaa iuus war full medd, þair sandes come again vnspedd.
    ?a1400 (▸a1338) R. Mannyng Chron. (Petyt) (1996) i. 606 Þis lady Venus was alle glad; þe toþer were for wrath mad.

  10. OK – this is spooky: Picked up one of my library books to read (a mystery by Susan Hill) and one of the characters in a side story has . . . CJD . . . there is already much description of what has and what will happen to her as the disease progresses.

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