22 Comments

  1. Rubin hasn’t read an Oz book in so long that he forgot that the *llow brick road was supposed to go TO the wizard.

  2. …. and nobody (certainly not the Wizard but not the Good Witch of the North either) gave the directions to the Scarecrow.

  3. Also, Dorothy had been following the yellow brick road for some time before she got to the scarecrow.

  4. “I don’t think that’s going to happen here”

    Ye of little faith.

    AFTER Dorothy et al got to the Wizard, but before he left, he sent her on several tasks. In this one, they got off to a challenging start.

    OR

    That isn’t Dorothy. This is the little girl who arrived in Oz BEFORE Dorothy.

  5. Seems to be a trend lately, words that sorta sound similar makes for a pun. That and inaccuracies in history or pop culture

  6. It’d have been better if the cartoonist had the courage of his convictions. If we had just seen the road with the sign “The Hollow Brick Road” and the word balloon saying “Dorothy, are you sure this is the right way to the Wizard”. Putting the Yellow Brick Road *immediately* next to it is just confusing. And the nonsensical dialog about the asking the scarecrow what directions the Wizard said is just incomprehensible. I figure the cartoonist did that because he was afraid the audience wouldn’t get the reference.

  7. Why would the holes be perfectly circular? I get cartoon physics, but if it’s supposed to be a brick road, the holes should at least be vaguely brick shaped. It’s kind of a big part of the joke.

  8. “AFTER Dorothy et al got to the Wizard, but before he left, he sent her on several tasks. In this one, they got off to a challenging start.”

    But her task was to go to the Winkie country and to kill the Witch of the West. And to get to the Witch’s castle in the Winkie country there was distinctly no road to take.

    “Which road leads to the Wicked Witch of the West?” asked Dorothy.

    “There is no road,” answered the Guardian of the Gates; “no one ever wishes to go that way.”

    “How, then, are we to find her?” enquired the girl.

    “That will be easy,” replied the man; “for when she knows you are in the Country of the Winkies she will find you, and make you all her slaves.”

    (It’s probably best not to challenge me on the details of any Oz book….)

  9. “But her task was to go to the Winkie country and to kill the Witch of the West. ”

    This was one of the tasks Mr. Baum skipped over to keep the story moving.

    “(It’s probably best not to challenge me on the details of any Oz book….)”

    Don’t remember doing that. I’d have to read at least one of them, or at least watch the movie, if I wanted to do that.

  10. @ Olivier – There’s a type of “hollow” brick that would be nearly big enough to fit the bil, and just happens to be much more common in the US than in Europe(*): cinder blocks“. They tend to be used for basements and garages, less often for houses, but of course never as paving stones.
    P.S. (*) – I’ve seen them used in Portugal and Greece, but never in Germany.

  11. @Kilby: we have a lot of them in France, too (“parpaings”) but though they can be used instead of bricks, they’re never called bricks. Bricks are baked clay, cinder blocks are concrete (I suppose cinder refers to the color). The holes are indeed bigger but using them for pavers, no chance of falling completely in; you’d probably break both ankles, rather.

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