24 Comments

  1. Just a few hours old, and that poor baby already has laryngitis.
    P.S. Does anyone know whether this sort of “baby display room” still exists in a real hospital? It’s a common comic convention (the movie “Boss Baby” had one), but none of the German hospitals we visited had anything of the kind: the universal standard practice was to put the baby’s crib right next to the mother’s bed.

  2. Kilby, I can only speak for 20-odd years ago, but when my kids were born there was a room like this: not for “display,” per se, but because they needed a place to stash the kids at night or when the baby needed to be somewhere other than with the mother (for example when the baby was crying all night and the mother had to get some sleep). When my niece was born 30 years ago, though, her hospital did have the comic strip standard viewing room, complete with a big sign reading GIRL BICKEL.

  3. The first one gave me pause for thought, as I associate mimes with black and white stripy shirts and a red and black shirt with the UK Dennis the Menace (or even, for a moment, I thought it might have been a Where’s Wally joke, but he is red and white).

    Oddly, checking the Wiki pages, the US and UK Dennis the Menaces came out within 3 days of each other in March 1951. The UK one was inspired, apparently, by a music hall song with “I’m Dennis the Menace from Venice” as a chorus.

  4. The Baldo reminds me of one of my favorite Mr. Boffo panels: Man who has just hit his thumb with a hammer calmly looks back over his shoulder at his wife and says, “Hon, what’s that word your brother says when he hits his thumb with a hammer?”

    The caption: Too Much Yoga.

  5. ” Does anyone know whether this sort of “baby display room” still exists in a real hospital?”

    ” I can only speak for 20-odd years ago, but when my kids were born there was a room like this: not for “display,” per se, but because they needed a place to stash the kids at night or when the baby needed to be somewhere other than with the mother (for example when the baby was crying all night and the mother had to get some sleep).”

    Was *THAT* standard practice even 20 years ago? Wouldn’t most people go home within hours after giving birth.? And don’t most mothers want to be with the baby even it does keep her awake for the first several days? Wouldn’t most families *insist* upon having the baby in their presence at all times?

    Or does my family have standards that aren’t on par with the American norm? I, personally (but hey… no judgement) find the idea of a viewing room and/or a baby *ever* being away from the mother inconceivable.

  6. Woozy, just my 2 cents because I’m certainly no expert, but there are many reasons to have a separate room for the newborns. It’s a delicate time in their lives and this makes it easier for the staff to monitor them. I for one find it sad if hospitals just send the mother and baby home as soon as possible. The mother is obviously exhausted and at the same time has to prepare for her life to be completely changed. When my wife gave birth, she enjoyed the time spent with our kids but was also happy to get a chance to sleep. Keeping the infants together in a room provides much more than “viewing”.

  7. One of the reasons that the German health system encourages keeping newborns in the mother’s room is to facilitate natural nursing as much as possible. The normal hospital stay is three days (7 days for cesarean delivery), which gives the mother time to adjust and recover, and ensures that the first three “standard” checkups happen on time. Once home, there are then up to ten visits by a midwife (checkups for both the mother and the baby).
    P.S. Total out-of-pocket costs for delivery, stay, and follow-up care under the German insurance system: € 0.00

  8. Sometimes baby can’t go right to mommy’s room, because they haven’t emerged completely healthy. So they go to either a room that has nurses in it 24/7 (for the worst cases) or to a room that has limited access (mommy can have visitors but baby can’t).
    So, whether they use it frequently or not, yes, the hospital has a room like this, and yes, it does have a big window in it that visitors can go to.

    Back in the dasy when my precious treasure was recently emerged, mommy was recovering from a fairly invasive surgery, and there were two receiving areas in the maternity ward… one that was private, and one that was open. New mommys, their babies, and assorted visitors sometimes gathered in the private rooms, and sometimes they didn’t.
    They brought my daughter to the room before they brought my ex-wife back… they were still putting her back together, patching leaks with tape. So I actually held my daughter before she did.

  9. “Was *THAT* standard practice even 20 years ago?” I spent some time as a kid in a hospital in Canada after being diagnosed as a diabetic. As I was ambulatory and bored most of the time, I’d wander down to the maternity ward and look at the babies through the window. So, yea, at least in Canada.

    “Is the final panel necessary?” I thought it was funny. It made a bad situation even worse.

  10. Woozy, when my wife was giving birth, the standard here was keeping the mother for one night. If the mother was good to go but the baby needed additional care, the mother would be discharged and the baby would be left behind.

    An exception was when the mother had had a C-section (which my wife did), in which case they’d keep her an extra day or two both because she’d had invasive surgery and so she wouldn’t harm herself picking up the baby at home. The day after giving birth my wife, to nobody’s surprise, said The hell with that, my baby and I are both going home.

    For all I know these days, with insurance companies trying to save every dime, childbirth is handled at a drive-thru lane.

  11. @ Grawlix – I agree with Stan about the sign, but I didn’t really see what was happening in the fourth panel until the strip showed up here. In the 3rd panel, the bird flies away to reveal the prefix in “Volcanoes”. The fourth panel reveals that the “bushes” in the first three panels are actually sheep, which wander off to expose the additional words.
    P.S. The author of “Extra Ordinary” lives in New Zealand, which has more sheep than people.

  12. I had to laugh at the volcano one; Hubby was evacuated from Indonesia (scuba diving) when their volcano blew. He next went to the Philippines (also scuba diving) and was evacuated for the same reason; two days to get there, one day there, and back home. I think he was rather annoyed at all this ’cause he hasn’t gone diving again ’til this week. I don’t THINK Bonaire has volcanoes.

  13. ‘“Is the final panel necessary?” I thought it was funny. It made a bad situation even worse.’

    I agree . . . and seems to be a great example of Kiwi humor.

  14. “Uh..The Scream as depicted by Munch is not the person screaming, but the universe.”

    And the one in this cartoon is the universe’s kids.

  15. What I want to know is whose painting does the “screamer” have on his/her/its wall?

  16. James – Whether it is kids or the adult, it is still a reference to a common misinterpretation of the painting.

  17. Since when can mimes levitate? I thought that was transcendental meditators. And why is the mime driving a real car? Surely he’d be miming driving a car… And any mime car would probably have a terrible drag coefficient, with the slightest breeze pushing it backwards… And I’m sure the autolock feature in any mime car would constantly be locking the mime inside the car…

    I suppose the non-mimed car is levitating because it just ran over a mimed Speed Bump

  18. Woozy – when my sister had my niece 30 years ago and my nephew 27 years ago, she had to stay overnight each time after giving birth. Since then other children who have joined our families have either been adopted (from China) or steps whose dad married into the family.

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