Adding a new CIDU because the page is currently overrun with comments about comments…

Nov29 that is priceless.JPG

“Dot” is a reference to Seurat’s girlfriend in “Sunday in the Park With George,” the musical based on his “A Sunday Aftenoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.”

Which still doesn’t tell me what Monsieur Melcher had in mind.

14 Comments

  1. This on’es easy- George Seurat is probably best known for his “pointillism” approach to painting- instead of applying paint with brush strokes, he applied dots of paint to the canvas and let the eye combine the points to create colors and images- similar to how television and computers use pixels.

    Or am I completely missing the point of the Random Comments page?

  2. Blinky’s halfway there. I don’t know that this has anything to do with Sunday in the Park with George other than using the same pun. Dot, a common nickname for Dorothy and also the fundamental unit of pointillist painting. I got that without knowing anything about the musical.

  3. It’s a “yes, that is all there is to it” cartoon.

    Seurat painted with dots. So it’d be funny if women in Seurat paintings were named Dot. Just like it’d be funny if the guy floating in the ocean were named Bob and the guy vomiting in the bathroom was named Ralph.

    That is all there is to it.

  4. @ woozy – Not to mention the guy nailed to the wall (named “Art”), or the one lying on the doorstep (named “Matt”).

  5. Can Mandy Patinkin sing? Well… one of the top hits of Forbidden Broadway’s twenty years is making fun of him, in a loving way. The question isn’t “can Mandy Patinkin sing” so much as “can Mandy Patinkin be reined in while singing”.

  6. Sorry. Data in Star Trek, the Next Generation and many movies.

    I had not mentioned Charles Kimbrough as I thought he might not be known. He played Jim Dial (the older more staid newsman) on the original Murphy Brown show. In the Sunday in the Park play he played the gentleman with the lady in the forefront of the picture on the right hand side. Dana Ivey played the lady with him – the gentleman’s wife.

    This was back in the day when one could see Broadway shows with same day half price tickets for less than $10 each.

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