66 Comments

  1. I always wanted to have a character open a speech with “Persons … and personettes …” Maybe the moment has passed for that joke.

  2. @ M.A, – Unfortunately, your “joke” is still very current reality in Germany. When addressing a large group, it has become customary to replace the basic form (“My colleagues…“) with gender specific versions (“My male colleagues and female colleagues…”). This affect is particulary virulent in political and academic circles, and some idiots in the latter group have even proposed adding a “gender asterisk” to German typography: effectively like a wildcard, so that “colleague*s” would stand for both forms.

  3. P.S. Years ago I invested in a copy of Dr. Spock’s “Baby and Child Care” as a reference. Unfortunately, some politically correct maniacs had edited the 8th edition, replacing every single reference to “…your doctor…” to read “…your doctor or nurse practitioner…“. The phrase appears multiple times on every page, and is excruciatingly tedious. Even worse, these idiots decided to use both male and female pronouns when discussing the baby (or child). This might have been tolerable if they had written “he or she” at every instance, but no, the editors decided to alternate gender, sometimes within the same paragraph, so that (effectively) the male baby from whom a diaper had been removed suddenly became female when it was time to put the new diaper on.

  4. “Even worse, these idiots decided to use both male and female pronouns when discussing the baby (or child).”

    I can imagine how annoying that would be, especially as there is an acceptable way to refer to a baby without mentioning its gender: ‘it’.

    I think a lot of people would object to this when they hear that, but it’s used all the time, perhaps unconsciously.

    “The baby is crying. I think it needs to be changed.”

    “What a beautiful baby! What’s its name?”

    “She had a baby girl last night. It weighed 7lbs.”

  5. Dr. Spock never asked me for my opinion, but I would have suggested he alternate genders by chapter. And not over-explain it, just do it.

  6. “I can imagine how annoying that would be, especially as there is an acceptable way to refer to a baby without mentioning its gender: ‘it’.”

    Many, if not most, people get at least a little bit huffy when you refer to their baby as “it”. Most won’t even let you refer to the dog as “it” That disemobodied hand that wanders around the mansion can be called “it”, because it doesn’t have a mouth to complain with.

  7. @Kilby: “(effectively) the male baby from whom a diaper had been removed suddenly became female when it was time to put the new diaper on.”

    Sounds like a really, really nasty and painful safety pin accident.

  8. I have a problem with guys for the two of us from strangers – such as waitresses. I used to say things such as – I have been a gal for some time now (but since sex change operations have come into being – I no longer say that). For some reason though when friends say something like “Hey you guys” that does not bother me.

    What is upsetting is when a waitress says to the two of us – “What will you ladies have.” Now he has long hair in a “que: (ponytail), but this is often said by someone who has only seen him from the front.

  9. Doctor or nurse practitioner is not gender correcting as either could be male or female. It seems to me that it is more that it is taking into account that not all pregnancies are treated by/babies delivered by doctors any longer.

  10. Lastly – as Robert keeps looking at the clock to go up to bed as it 3:20 am –

    If this random comments, I am taking leave to post that our reenactment unit is doing an event this weekend June 1 & 2 at Old Bethpage Village Restoration of life on Long Island under the occupation of same by the British Army during the American Revolution. LI was the longest continuously occupied area of the colonies with the British army moving in shortly after the Battle of Brooklyn in September 1776 and the last boatload of soldiers that left in 1783 was from the area. Other units are joining us – interpreting both sides as armies and also occupied civilians. It is our second year of the event and it went very well last year – after this year it will be done biannually.

    website for unit will appear if my name clicked on.

    Bill – feel free to pull this if I overstepped and my apologies.

  11. suggestion – since “old random comments” is still the easiest of the Randoms to get to, maybe the head post text there is a good place for a link to New Random (or Meta New Random).

  12. Mitch, that’s the problem: the template isn’t allowing me to change where that leads to. Or if it does, the method for doing so has changed.

  13. @ Meryl A – You do make an excellent point (that both doctors and nurses can be of either gender), but the way that poor (R.I.P.) Dr. Spock’s editors inserted the phrase made it seem much more likely that they were simply propagating the traditional (pervasive) gender segregation of the roles. If they had just used “health care professional”, it would have been more inclusive, and would have avoided (some of) the awkwardness of the either/or phrase.

  14. Yes, I understand. What I’m suggesting changing is in the post that goes

    “Please note that this is intended for public comic comments only: if you want to send me a CIDU, or a comic for some specific folder (Ewww, Oy, etc), or you want to inform me of a typo, please e-mail me at CiduBill@gmx.com

    Since that is where the sidebar link goes, in there would be a good place to put a link to the actual Random Comments 2019 —

    https://godaddyandthesquirrelmustbothdie.wordpress.com/random-comments-2019/comment-page-1/

    https://godaddyandthesquirrelmustbothdie.wordpress.com/random-comments-2019/comment-page-1/

    Yes, that means giving in to WP oddity, and requiring people to use two steps. But that might be better than having no easy way to get to Random Comments 2019, and people still adding to Old Random Comments.

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