51 Comments

  1. Why is this strip tagged as “unaccountable anger”? I think her anger is eminently understandable.

  2. “Connie is angry because Walt is asking her what took her so long, when the reason for the delay was an insipid test-messaging session they were both involved in?”

    Well…. yeah….

    Isn’t that apparent and understandable? She’s irritated because she has to stop to engage in a text conversation that really doesn’t matter and is irritating (of course, she put money in the meter–she’s not an idiot; and the comment about the toilet paper could have waited especially as they are going to see each other face to face in a minute or two) and wasting time and when she gets there he innocently asks her why she was late as though it was her fault for dallying when he caused it all. All married couples go through this. And … yes, it is anger inducing. Quite justified as Kilby says.

    “they were both involved in”

    She unwillingly and unnecessarily in. Her first text explaining she is on here way was the only one nesc. and all the other were pointless and time wasting.

  3. Its not a “war”. It’s a somewhat irritating sequence of unnecessary texts. Connie think it’d be impolite not to respond or leave on read. The straw breaking the camels back is the guileless and passive accusatory “what took you so long”.

  4. Bill: Her complaint wasn’t about the emoji “war” (although that might have been annoying), but about Walt’s complaint.

    I might not be annoyed if my wife delays me, but I’m sure to be annoyed if my wife delays me and then asks why I’ve been delayed.

  5. Bill: I agree up until the point where Walt asks, “What took you so long?” He knows what took her so long, he was complicit. She was complicit too, and that’s fine, as long as the other complicit party doesn’t unilaterally decide to withdraw his complicity — that’s what causes the anger.

  6. They’re equally guilty of acting like 12-year-old girls, so neither one of them has the right to be angry.

    But you might have noticed that this strip’s artist enjoys drawing Connie angry. Either that or Connie’s just one bad day away wiping out her entire family.

  7. Well, there used to be an older brother away at college, so maybe Connie’s already started…

  8. “Well, there used to be an older brother away at college, so maybe Connie’s already started…”

    I had exactly the same thought!

    Also: Wouldn’t this strip make more sense if it had been adapted for Jeremy and Sara? I’ve never seen an adult fill the screen with emojis.

  9. “They’re equally guilty of acting like 12-year-old girls” I don’t think either are acting like 12 year old girls,

    “so neither one of them has the right to be angry”. She is perfectly justified in being angry in the implication that she is late because she dallied for her own inefficient reasons. She’s late because he delayed her and he should be aware of it.

    She’s not actually that angry at him for delaying her but she’s livid at his cluelessness for not only not recognizing the fact, but for also implying somehow it’s her fault.

    I’m with her 100%.

  10. Woozy, I’ve never seen an adult fill the screen with emojis.

    When was the last time you did this?

  11. ” The straw breaking the camels back is the guileless and passive accusatory ‘what took you so long’.”

    The problem with this question isn’t that it’s accusatory. The problem is that it’s stupid. He knows EXACTLY what took her so long.

  12. “there used to be an older brother away at college, so maybe Connie’s already started…”

    Chad has Chuck Cunningham’s disease.

  13. The last time I filled the screen with emojis was when my lock screen failed to engage, and my phone bounced around in my pocket for a few minutes. Luckily my pocket couldn’t find the “Send” button.

  14. “Woozy, I’ve never seen an adult fill the screen with emojis.”

    That was a weakness in the joke, but I don’t think it is particularly relevant. FWIW I read that as a series of back and forths and not as a single message.

    “When was the last time you did this?”

    Well, last week when I wanted to see if my sister would see the same sushi emojis as I sent.

    “The problem with this question isn’t that it’s accusatory. The problem is that it’s stupid. He knows EXACTLY what took her so long.”

    My step-father was oblivious in these things. But the annoying thing (my other sister is a master of this) is to imply after dallying and causing delays and diversions that somehow it was the other person doing it.

  15. I think the “put money in the meter” and “we’re out of toilet paper” were more relevant and on target than all the emojis. I read the emojis in panel 7 as “blah, blah, blah”. It may have been more on target if it were rambling text “I’m by the window…” “… I’m sure I’ll find you” “I’m wearing my black vest…” “… yes, I know what you look like” falling and flying off the panel.

  16. The reminder about the meter was ok. The TP bulletin was a pointless distraction. What did he expect her to do about it?

  17. I also interpreted the emojis as shorthand for “too much text to fit in this cartoon panel,” not literally a series of emojis.

    But regardless, even if Connie was texting like a 12-year old girl, I don’t see why that invalidates her frustration in the last panel, which is about Walt’s question, not the texting itself.

  18. @Brian in STL: “The TP bulletin was a pointless distraction. What did he expect her to do about it?”

    Swing by the Ladies’ Room and steal some, before heading on to the restaurant table?

  19. @James Pollock,

    “Chad has Chuck Cunningham’s disease.”

    LOL! I wonder if all people suffering from that disease have had/will have names that start with ‘Ch’. Parents be warned!

  20. “The reminder about the meter was ok.”

    Oh, Good God! It was NOT!!!

    The reminder of the meter was irritating and pointless as she’s not a child and knows how to use a meter and it’s irritating and patronizing and at times f###ing INFURIATING when the other *keeps* treating you like an idiot. But you can’t respond “For effs sake! I’m 45 years old I know how to use a f###ing parking meter!” or else you come off as the ogre.

  21. “The reminder of the meter was irritating and pointless as she’s not a child and knows how to use a meter”

    Neither of which is proof that she wasn’t distracted at the wrong time, or, if wherever these people live still has old style coin-operated meters, she had a pocketful of change handy. See, if you don’t, then you have to find a place where you can get some, and quickly, and that can take a bit of time. That first message may suggest that she had trouble finding a space, and is later than she (and he) anticipated.

    ” it’s irritating and patronizing and at times f###ing INFURIATING when the other *keeps* treating you like an idiot.”

    He asked once. If that’s infuriating, then these are people who should not be married. To anyone, but specifically not to each other.

  22. If you do a risk analysis on the meter you will see that the expected cost of feeding the meter is one coin (or whatever it takes) and the expected cost of not feeding the meter is one parking ticket times the probability of the meter maid coming around. Multiply that by the probability of her forgetting to feed the meter and compare it to the cost (including consequences) of reminding her.

  23. woozy, you have to push back occasionally, ogre or not, or it keeps coming.

    If you spend a lot of time dealing with the less operationally competent (e.g. if you teach or advise undergrads) you’ll tend to develop a habit of supplying helpful advice: if you don’t they come back over and over again with predictable followup questions. It’s very effective operant conditioning. Thing is though that you end up doing it in random situations without really thinking. At that point it’s pretty hard to provide a remark at the right level of usefulness, or realize that you shouldn’t and shut up, because if you were thinking about it you’d not have said anything in the first place.

    Then there’s mansplaining, too.

  24. Having read ZITS since its inception (despite loathing the name of the comic), if anything, Connie would have to remind WALT to fill the meter.

  25. Similar to Andrea (and pardon my never including the accent for your name, I don;t know how to do so with it being an apostrophe) it surprises me that she has parked the car while he is sitting the restaurant – unless they have come separately and are meeting for dinner.

    The only emoji I use is the smiling face and generally I use it due to my odd sense of humor and thinking that something will be taken with different meaning than humor.

    I would have figured that he could have waited than when they were sitting at the table to say he forgot about the TP – and if he is like Robert – they would have a large supply from Costco, even before they used up the last of the old package. (He is always worried about running out -and we have 2 full and a started roll out in the RV in addition to the spares in the house.)

    Yesterday I sent a text to Robert while I was getting ready to make dinner. Not unusual to do so – check what soup or side dish for dinner if I forgot to ask. In this case though I wrote that I was about to call the house phone (from the kitchen) so he would know to answer it. (The machine normally does.) Imagine sending a text message telling someone to answer the phone – just a ridiculous thing to do.

  26. Since I have to type in her name so frequently, I actually have a small “Andréa” file on my computer. Literally just her name, so I can copy-and-paste it when necessary.

  27. No, SOME people actually store toilet paper in their bathrooms, where it belongs. I thought this comic strange back on 4 March; it just seemed to ‘fit in’ with this thread.

  28. Bill, I’m halfway there already — chances are I’ll relate what I’m talking about to a Peanuts strip. Then I have to go and find the right one, since my wife didn’t grow up with Peanuts, and sometimes it can be tricky. Eg: I wanted to find the sequence where Peppermint Patty is camp councilor, and there’s a girl who literally throws herself into the things she’s trying for the first time (learning to swim: “Here I go!”); I wasted my time going back to the late 60s strips where Marcie was introduced, along with Clara and Sophie, and I couldn’t find it! I thought I was going crazy! Turns out Schulz revisited that theme in the late 80’s early 90s, and that’s what I was thinking of.
    The one where Linus has to explain to a nonplussed Charlie Brown that tempers flair on a rainy day in the Van Pelt household after he and Lucy yell at each other over trivial things is also a perennial touchstone.
    Back when the web was new I had my resume up, and every other thing was linked to a cartoon, mostly Peanuts…
    “Watch it, beagle!” was a common refrain when I was growing up…

  29. @lark: As we stagger through the end of a brutal winter, Mrs. Shrug and I have taken to emulating the PEANUTS cartoon in which one of us pats the other on the head and says “Be of good cheer, Snoopy.”

  30. Shrug: you should beep Mrs. Shrug on the nose; I’m sure you haven’t beeped her in a long time.

    …And I’m sure she hasn’t missed it a bit.

  31. Actually, we have been known to do quite a bit of nose beeping; it just didn’t occur to me to think of that as specifically a PEANUTS thing. (But now it probably will.)

    Flexing his beeping finger. . .

  32. I beep the nose of my 6-year-old niece. To which, she tries to return the favor, but being short, winds up flailing and, if I’m not careful, smacking me in the face. Life has tradeoffs.

  33. Andréa ( I copied the name as recommended) – We have very small bathrooms. (I have been in smaller one but that was a at a client and just a toilet and sink – when one sat on the toilet one’s legs were under the sink.) We have sinks and sink cabinets which are so small that we are not sure we could replace them if we had to as they are smaller than the smallest ones in the home stores. They have one drawer in the cabinet – under the shelf. Upstairs half of the cabinet is taken up by a plastic shoe box with first aid stuff in it. So. we can fit 2 spare rolls of toilet paper and that it is about it. (Husband has the drawer for his shaving stuff and hair brush – I bring mine my brush in from the bedroom. The sink downstairs has a real shoe box in it with our “guest towels” and hand towels on are on top of the box. Other side has cleaning items for the bathroom and 2 spare rolls of tp.

    So, we can’t actually keep the huge Costco package of tp in either bathroom – or even split between them. The rest of the spares sit along with the spare boxes of tissues, some floor cleaning items, and the laundry bag that hangs for tossing dirty laundry into, in the bottom of the linen – or hall – closet upstairs. Spare rolls of paper towels require a trip to the basement – currently do to an disagreement over which to buy we have both full sheet rolls and half sheet rolls of paper towels.

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