10 Comments

  1. Probably Winter Wallaby is right. My immediate thought on seeing the cartoon before seeing his comment was that our hero/victim signed up to way too many 30-day free trial offers but neglected to cancel any of them after a month and thus ran up debts over the subsequent years that somehow landed him in court. However, for that to work his barrister would have had to say something more plural than warning him against “a” 30-day free trial.

  2. Yep WW is right – “you asked for a free trial and by golly you got it, with all its attendant expenses.”

  3. Sorry, Bill, just another case of “There’s nothing here but the cartoonist noticing that a word has two meanings and not doing anything much with it, so kindly lower your expectations”.

  4. >>>Sorry, Bill, just another case of “There’s nothing here but the cartoonist noticing that a word has two meanings and not doing anything much with it, so kindly lower your expectations”.

    I’d be hard pressed to find a person who wouldn’t think that is enough! That is a pun and a clever and funny pun at that. No expectations need to be lowered at all!

    However, as narmitaj points out, it’s conceivable that some people might miss the pun.

  5. “I’d be hard pressed to find a person who wouldn’t think that is enough!”

    B.A. & me, for two. I think it could have been made into a good joke, but this wasn’t one.

  6. Gee, I just thought it was the sort of thing that my dad warned me about – never trust a free trial offer, it may be a scam.

    Free court trial offered did not occur to me until I read the comments.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s