18 Comments

  1. Yes, that’s what he’s saying. I think he’s wrong. The joke is that he said this before the last election, too.

    Of course the timeline doesn’t work, that would mean he was in this same class two years ago.

  2. I’m really losing patience with Mrs. Olsen being everybody’s target. She is to this strip what customers are to Retail.

  3. But she’s always the mute sounding board for his rhetorical comments. And there’s a well established PATTERN if her being the strip’s butt monkey.

  4. I sometimes think Mallett just can’t make up his mind: some days she’s a positive role, while other days Frazz considers it okay to mock her in front if the students (which in fact is never okay).

  5. I don’t think he’s necessarily saying old people don’t vote with the future in mind, but rather kids have just as much skin in the game as adults, actually more, so why shouldn’t they have a voice in the election?

  6. “I don’t think he’s necessarily …. a voice in the election?”

    Which is kind or rhetorical as the answer is very obvious. We desperately *do* want you to vote in the election as soon as you capable of understanding the issues and making informed decisions. Which comes at 18, a very, very, very young adulthood.

    Which makes the cartoon kind of annoyingly strawman.

    (the real question, which I did not understand when I was young and don’t understand now is, why the heck *don’t* young people vote immediately and eagerly? I can only speak for myself but I couldn’t *wait* to vote.)

  7. Look at how community referendums to allocate real estate taxes to improve public schools, and you’ll see how much older folks in that community value the future.

  8. “(the real question, which I did not understand when I was young and don’t understand now is, why the heck *don’t* young people vote immediately and eagerly? I can only speak for myself but I couldn’t *wait* to vote.)”

    I haven’t been a young person for a really long time, and the young person I made had an 18th birthday that came the day after election day in a presidential election year, but she voted in the midterms as a 20-year-old.

    That said, I think the reason so many youngsters don’t vote is because so few politicians reach out to them. Campaigns, in general, are much more likely about why you SHOULDN’T vote for the other guy, and so people who aren’t tied up in politics find that they have nobody to vote for and lots of reasons not to vote for anyone.

    Sometimes, I sit and think about imaginary ways to improve elections. One such imaginary system would give each voter two votes for each race… one “for”, and one “against”. So, the D guy might get 47 percent “for”, and 47 percent against, and the R guy might get 47 percent “for” and 47 percent “against”, and the third-party guy who got 3 percent for and 0 percent against wins the election.

    I thought that sounded like a really good alternative to the current system. Then I realized that this system would just encourage even MORE negative campaign ads.

  9. It seems to me that being in constant contact with young people (as Mrs. Olsen and I both are) makes you *more* sensitive to their future.

  10. I see strong parallels between Mrs. Olsen and Calvin’s teacher Miss Wormwood, but of the two, I think Mrs. Olsen is treated more fairly.

  11. Miss Wormwood isn’t an actual character, since we only see her from the point of view of somebody who believes his stuffed animal is sentient. The very model of an unreliable narrator.

    We’ve seen enough of Mrs. Olsen that some of us want to smack the smug off of Frazz’s face.

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