27 Comments

  1. Windchill makes the temperature feel colder than it is.

    The embarrassment of weighing in at the doctor makes you feel fatter than you actually are.

    It would make more sense if doctors really required to you strip to your underwear when you weigh in… Or if she were wearing a hospital gown (which are always drafty).

  2. I’d say the wind-chill reference is just sloppy and non literal. It’s like he thinks it amusing that some measurement which can be reported in a numerically precise way is always tied into the “but it feels like…” adjusted report. And wouldn’t it be funny if weight were handled that way too?

  3. @ Andréa – It’s just you. I agree with woozy that this comic is distasteful(*), but it’s not that disgusting.

    P.S. (*) @ ja – Doctors often ask patients to disrobe for an examination, and getting an accurate weight measurement can be a contributing factor for it. However, I’ve never seen a doctor (and/or pediatrician) do this in a room that was open to the public.

  4. Outside a prison, or perhaps a military installation, is it common for a medical examination room in the USA to lack a door? Sheesh!

  5. Perhaps she took off her clothes on her own in an attempt to make her weigh less on the scale. Alone in the exam and waiting to be seen, she decided to weigh herself.

    The open door could be because it is a triage room where a nurse takes your vital statistics before putting you in a room for the doctor’s examination, It also serves to show the doctor walking past to emphasize this is in a medical environment which tend to be colder that the average home. A casual read may miss the signage on the wall.

    Because she has taken off her clothes more of her skin is exposed to the chill air which makes her more aware of it. She may weigh 180 but the cold air on her skin makes her feel that there is more of it which makes her feel like she weighs 230 pounds.

  6. mitchd and ja have it.

    I realize that a cartoon character isn’t a real person but seeing an overweight middle-aged woman in her underwear feeling despondent about her weight seems like an invasion of privacy. That she doesn’t actually exist hardly helps as there are millions of decent people in our lives it could apply to.

    I felt it was mean.

  7. ” I’ve never seen a doctor (and/or pediatrician) do this in a room that was open to the public.”

    At my doctor’s office, the scale is in the hallway, outside the examination rooms.

  8. James Pollock – at my doctor’s office too, but they never make me take off more than my boots. I just took the toddler in for his 18-month visit (really, just for his shots – I didn’t even need to wait to see the doctor, just the nurses & resident), and he was allowed to not only stay dressed, but keep his shoes on. (Granted, a dry diaper weighs over 100g, and I wouldn’t be surprised if his shoes were less than that, so there’s not really any point in taking stuff off if you’re keeping the diaper on, especially since they don’t even have me check if it’s wet.)

    Speaking as a woman who’s over 200lb, the relative sizes are really off in this picture. For her to be half as fat as she’s drawn, she would need to be really short to only weigh 180 lb.

  9. “at my doctor’s office too, but they never make me take off more than my boots.”

    I don’t even take off my shoes to get weighed, and didn’t have to take my shirt off for a 12-lead EKG.

    “Speaking as a woman who’s over 200lb, the relative sizes are really off in this picture.”
    Perhaps the doctor meant Kgs, not Lbs, in the caption.

  10. I don’t know if they care about shoes. I just have had my last few checkups in the winter (both my kids were born in the winter, on top of it being my birthday, and I’ve managed to stay on top enough of things that it’s yet to move into Spring). Granted, at my weight, who cares about another 2-3 kg, but I think it’s just a reflex ‘those are boots, they come off’, because most boots are heavier than mine (they’re only ankle high).

  11. “For her to be half as fat as she’s drawn, she would need to be really short to only weigh 180 lb.” – Christine

    I agree, which makes me think that the scale is showing the higher number, and she’s making excuses for it — the wind chill caused by the movement outside the door makes it higher.

  12. I would say that the fact that the door was left open, probably accidentally, is the gist of the joke. Literally, there is a wind chill because of it. Figuratively, she thinks that the passers by in the hallway see her as much more than 180.

    I do agree with Christine that she is not 180 pounds. But then again Mike Baldwin isn’t known for drawing accurate depictions of the human body.

  13. I notice, too, that ‘Exam Room C-7 is written INSIDE what we are assuming is the exam room. If it isn’t, that means SHE”S standing in the hallway, and the two striding characters are walking in the exam room. All in all, POORLY thought out and NOT funny.

  14. Yeah, I think this one’s just mean-spirited and not really funny, no matter what the joke is supposed to be.

  15. I didn’t see this as mean as other’s are. I think the woman is drawn the way she feels, not the way she actually looks. She’s 180 lbs, but circumstances have made her feel overweight, so that’s how she looks to herself. Then the joke is just “sometimes we feel fatter than we really are,” which doesn’t seem mean.

    As for defending the internal logic or actual humor value of the strip. . . well, I got nothing.

  16. “there’s not really any point in taking stuff off if you’re keeping the diaper on, especially since they don’t even have me check if it’s wet.”

    It shouldn’t matter if the diaper is wet. Compare the weight with a dry diaper moments before it becomes wet, with the weight with a wet diaper moments later.

  17. You make a very good point about the diaper. The issue comes with if the baby has been sitting in a diaper for a while and there are multiple uses. (Granted, the reason that I’m used to thinking it matters is that they will use a dry diaper to tare the scale, and you can’t do that accurately if the diaper on the baby is wet. But that’s a different issue. They will generally even tare with the diaper that you then put on the baby, rather than taring with one just like what the baby’s wearing.)

  18. Regarding the baby’s diaper, it’s my recollection that we changed the baby immediately before the exam.

    Kinda rude to present the doctor with a reeking child, isn’t it? Especially if he has to undress him as part of the examination.

  19. Our doctor’s office also has people weighed in the hall with shoes,etc. on. More important than that is that one is not asked to empty their pockets – cellphone, wallet, lots of keys…. The nurse always laughs when we empty our pockets and hand the contents to each other to hold when we are each weighed.

  20. I never worried too much about when I was going to change the diaper, but that was mainly because I knew we’d be changing it for the weighing. Even if I showed up early enough to change the diaper, there was no guarantee that it would still be dry by exam time.

  21. I agree with @Bookworm. She always pretends she weighs 180 lbs, but with everything stripped away she has to admit (or make excuses for) that she really does weigh 230 lbs.

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