The Card

nan

Are we to interpret this as Jason actually intending to continue from there (in a Mother’s Day card)? I’m not sure how you can know that opening without knowing it doesn’t end well.

Unless, I guess, this was all perfectly innocent and Andy actually comes from Nantucket. Which some people must, after all.

17 Comments

  1. I think we’re supposed to assume that Jason doesn’t know how it goes on from there. He thinks it’s a standard poem opening along the lines of “Roses are red, violets are blue”.He’s only 10, after all, and virtually all of his precociousness is in STEM subjects.

  2. Limericks (even clean ones) hardly qualify as “romantic” poetry, and those that mention “Nantucket” in the first line tend to have a word in the last line that rhymes with “…uck“.

  3. There once was a mom from Nantucket
    Who put up with all sorts of ruckus
    I for one
    Am glad she had sons
    And didn’t decide to chuck it.

  4. There once was a man from Nantucket
    Who kept all his cash in a bucket.
    His daughter, named Nan,
    Ran off with a man.
    And as for the bucket, Nantucket.

  5. I expect that if Jason did come up with a limerick that started that way, it would end with an equation.

  6. There once was a lass from Nantucket
    Who washed out her things in a bucket
    Till the winds and the breezes
    Blew away her chemises
    So she threw up her hands and said, “to heck with it.”

  7. I want to know what’s happening to Jason’s head in the first panel. Are his eyebrows turning into a flock of birds? Why is he sticking his tongue out?

  8. There once was a man from Nantucket
    who carried wet glue in a bucket.
    ‘Till once did he trip
    and lose his firm grip.
    Then putting his foot down, he stuck it.

  9. Da Yadda da yadda nantucket
    Ya Dada ya dadada bucket
    Then two random lines
    The ends of which rhymes
    And then anything else but the words, “fuck it”

  10. See, I actually knew the clean versions of the “Nantucket Limerick” before I even knew there were dirty versions.

    That first one that Susan T-O posted, and then the sequel verses:

    There once was a man from Nantucket
    Who kept all his cash in a bucket.
    His daughter, named Nan,
    Ran off with a man.
    And as for the bucket, Nantucket.

    Pa followed them all to Pawtucket —
    The man, the girl Nan, and the bucket —
    Pa said to the man
    He was welcome to Nan
    But as for the cash, well, Pawtucket.

    But the pair followed Pa to Manhasset
    Still carrying the cash as an asset
    Nan and the man
    Stole the money and ran,
    And as for the bucket, Manhasset.

  11. I never knew about the “bucket of cash” number before this thread. I had made mine up just to annoy people who expected a dirty limerick from the first line. I guess the coincidence of the rhyme “bucket” must stem from the limited number of options.

  12. From W. S. Gilbert:
    There was an Old Man of St. Bees
    Who was stung in the arm by a wasp.
    When asked, “Does it hurt?”
    He replied, “No, it doesn’t,
    But I thought all the while ’twas a hornet.”

  13. There once was a man from Iran
    Whose limericks never would scan.
    When he was asked why
    He gave this reply,
    “I just can’t help putting as many syllables in the last line as I possibly can.”

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